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American Indian Festivals - Tennessee

In 1830, with Tennessean Andrew Jackson as President, the U.S. Congress passed the Indian Removal Act. Tennessee Congressman David Crockett bitterly opposed the bill with many others, yet it passed by only one vote. The Indian removal of 1838-1839 displaced over 100,000 Native American Indians from their ancestral homes in the Southeastern United States to a reservation over 1,000 miles away in the territory now known as Oklahoma. This removal was conducted by forcing the Indians to travel by four primary routes. Approximately 4000 died along the way, and the Cherokees called it "Nunna dual Isuny," which translates as "The Trail Where We Cried". Today, it is referred to as the Trail of Tears.

Bell's & Benge's Memorial Motorcycle Ride & American Indian Social & Reenactment Walk Festivals
Two of the land routes Indians were forced to travel, Bell’s and Benge’s, passed through Giles County, TN and crossed in Pulaski, TN, making this the only location in the United States to have a connection to more than one land removal route. The convergence of these two historic trails in Pulaski, and Davy Crockett’s strong opposition to the Indian removal inspired the construction of a fitting memorial to the Trail of Tears and to David Crockett. This event causes one to truly remember the people who walked the Trail of Tears. It is held in November.

Riders leave at the Ride Captains discretion at approximately 10:30 A.M. Ride Departure Sites are Ardmore, TN - Iron Horse, Lawrenceburg, TN – Randy’s Cycles, Mt Pleasant, TN - Pear Tree Shopping Center, Fayetteville, TN - Misfits Club House.

The walk begins on Jefferson and Village Square and continues onto South First Street turn onto East College Street converging at 11:00 a.m. at the "Trail of Tears Interpretive Center" parking lot in Pulaski. Native American Social follows. At the beginning of the ride participants are given a sheet with the name of the Head of Family who walked the Benge’s Route. They will be riding in memory of that family group. When everyone comes together at the TOT Memorial in Pulaski there will be a special presentation for the riders. [More]

Clarksville Area Intertribal Powwow
Hosted by the Natice Cultural Circle at Powwow Grounds across the Red River from Port Royal State Park, Adams, TN.
All Drums & Dancers are welcome.
Admission Fees: Adults $5.00; Children & Seniors $2.00; Active Duty Military with ID Free. For information contact: Paul Slaughter at pdslaugher60@bellsouth.net

Dragging Canoe, Doublehead Memorial Powwow
Nashville Tennessee
Grand entrance at noon each day. Admission $5.00 adult, $3.00 children. Event features many entertainers and other activities. All drums and dancers welcome; daily pay for dancers.
Sococody@aol.com

MTSU American Indian Festival
The MTSU American Indian Festival is dedicated to the American Indians and the celebration of their culture and heritage. Now in its 7th year, this award winning Festival has become the largest event of its kind in the state of Tennessee.

The three day festival hosts hundreds of dancers, dozens of Native musicians and special guests, nationally recognized drum and singing groups, Native arts of every kind, working craftsmen, traditional Native foods, game and skill demonstrations, photo opportunities, cultural displays and educational exhibits, audience participation, and safe family entertainment.

Dancers from as far away as New Mexico, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Canada, Oregon, the Dakotas, and Oklahoma plus every state in the South and Midwest attend this yearly event. In 2005 there were over 300 registered dancers from 14 states and eleven drum groups.

The three days include celebrations of cultural traditions, Native music and exhibition dancing, family reunions, friendly competitions, honor ceremonies, and special dedications. [More]

Spirit of the Wolf Inter-tribal Celebration
Spirit of the wolf inter-tribal celebration event is held at the Appalachian Fair grounds in Gray, Tennessee. Admissions: children under 5 years free, 5-12 years: $2.00; 12 and up $4.00. For more information, contact: Leon Gilliam, 423-384-9909.

Tennessee State Powwow
Indian Food, Arts & Crafts, Live Music, Dances
Long Hunter State Park, Nashville, Tennessee, 2910 Hobson Pike
(From Nashville, take I-40 East to Mt. Juliet Road, Exit 226-A. Go south (right) about 6 miles to the main park entrance. Or take I-24 East to Old Hickory Boulevard, Exit 62. Go north (left) on SR171 about 6 miles to the main park entrance.)

Admission: $5 adults, $2 children ages 6-12
children 5 years old and under free
615-232-9179, naia@bellsouth.net

Tullahoma Intertribal Powwow
South Jackson Civic Center grounds, 404 South Jackson Street, Tullahoma, Tennessee.
A Top 20 Event by the Southeast Tourism Society. No Contest event. All drums and dancers welcome.
nativeway@mindspring.com

Native American Festival - Tennessee Powwow
Cherokee Indian Heritage & Sandhill Crane Viewing Days - Features a lecture series celebrating the local area and featuring wildlife and Cherokee Indian Heritage experts on Saturday at the Birchwood School.

 
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